Stick welding for a beginner - Part2

Stick welders are an economic choice, when you consider overall cost of operation, and initial investment. There are no cylinders to rent or maintain no parts to change or replace either. A stick welder is usually the cheapest welder to buy initially as well. One of the only drawbacks that has been cited against stick welding is that it doesn’t have the greatest metal transfer efficiency, only reaching about 60% of total rod transferred to the metal. If course this factors in flux loss and spatter as well.

A good welding rod though will have bery little spatter, and can be used right up to where the flux tapers off into the electrode holder. Although welding right up to the stump is not advised because of the danger of melting the electrode holder, it can be done, when necessary to get the most out of a welding rod. With the amps correctly set, very little spatter will be present, even with the use of cellulose based rods. A good quality stick welder has very little to go wrong with it, whether it is based off a transformer or inverter design. Another advantage, especially where inverter welders are concerned, is that they travel easily and are fairly light. If you have long enough cables you will not be restricted to indoor use only. Stick welding may be performed equally well inside, and outside. Being comparatively light weight, and free of encumbrances like tanks, and hoses, and even complicated torches, a stick welder can go almost anywhere you can drag it.

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Comments

Most preferably I use Stick welders because they are economical, most effective, and inexpensive. Source top5writingservices.com can guide you best in reading reviews. Perhaps this is the cheapest welder yet it guarantees maximum efficiency.