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Thread: Which Welder for 1/8 to 1/4" Angle Iron

  1. Default Which Welder for 1/8 to 1/4" Angle Iron

    Hello everyone. I am pretty new to welding except for the HH140 we have at work that tac with every once in a while. I am looking for a welder for my shop at home. I am looking for advice on a welder that will give me structural strength if I should decide to weld on my utility trailer in the future. The trailer is 3/16th angle. I dont plan on welding anything over 1/4". If I were to ever weld a tongue on my trailer or anything else critical, it would be in the future after I learn the trade. I do plan on building a table and some decorative items as well.
    All I have at this time is 120v in my shop, but I do have an electrical panel. If needed, I could get a 220v plug wired in.
    I know the Hobart 140 is not going to give me the structural strength that I would be looking for after the trade is learned, practiced, and becomes second nature.
    In your opinions, what would be a good welder to look at to accomplish my goals i am really taking to liking the reviews on the Everlast welders. Am liking the Power I-Mig 200
    Thank you, Mike

  2. Default

    Yeah,

    If MIG is your process-of-choice, which makes sense, for trailer stuff, the I-Mig 200 is a good choice at around $650, especially since it will Stick weld too, for those time when welding outdoors makes MIG a little less than ideal.

    Otherwise, I?ll recommend that you step and consider the 211Si, as it has 210 amps, does MIG, Stick, and DC TIG (and includes the TIG accessories, including HF starts and a gas solenoid), sale-priced right now at $999. It?s real multi-function unit that has no competition (since it comes with the TIG package and HF arc starts).

    You?ll undoubtedly be happy to have the added TIG process at some point, especially for only a few bucks more.

    Otherwise, 1/8" or .125 is easy on Everlast units (like mine) via their dual-voltage capacity, but 220/240V is undoubtedly better for heavier chassis portions of trailers, especially if MIG is the process, I'd think. But then, you may even consider doing TIG roots, with MIG cover passes on 120V at certain joints.

    I'm using my 210EXT in an unattached garage lately, that only has 120V power, and I'm really liking the performance there, having used it previously and exclusively at 240V, before then. But I'm speaking about TIG only.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	211Si.jpg 
Views:	16 
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ID:	14062
    Last edited by christian; 12-31-2020 at 05:05 AM.
    Everlast 210 EXT (2015)

    www.youtube.com/newjerusalemtimes

  3. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by christian View Post
    Yeah,

    If MIG is your process-of-choice, which makes sense, for trailer stuff, the I-Mig 200 is a good choice at around $650, especially since it will Stick weld too, for those time when welding outdoors makes MIG a little less than ideal.

    Otherwise, I?ll recommend that you step and consider the 211Si, as it has 210 amps, does MIG, Stick, and DC TIG (and includes the TIG accessories, including HF starts and a gas solenoid), sale-priced right now at $999. It?s real multi-function unit that has no competition (since it comes with the TIG package and HF arc starts).

    You?ll undoubtedly be happy to have the added TIG process at some point, especially for only a few bucks more.

    Otherwise, 1/8" or .125 is easy on Everlast units (like mine) via their dual-voltage capacity, but 220/240V is undoubtedly better for heavier chassis portions of trailers, especially if MIG is the process, I'd think. But then, you may even consider doing TIG roots, with MIG cover passes on 120V at certain joints.

    I'm using my 210EXT in an unattached garage lately, that only has 120V power, and I'm really liking the performance there, having used it previously and exclusively at 240V, before then. But I'm speaking about TIG only.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	211Si.jpg 
Views:	16 
Size:	21.6 KB 
ID:	14062
    Thank you so much for the detailed response. It really give me an idea on a setup for the shop. Yes, i do believe that a dual voltage multi-process unit would be good for the shop, as metal thickness will vary with the home projects i have planned. I will look into those units.
    Have a great day and Happy New Year

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