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Thread: Questions About I-Mig 140

  1. Default Questions About I-Mig 140

    I am relatively new to welding and am looking to buy my first mig, I had a few questions about the I-Mig 140 that the customer service department was unable to give me a clear answer on when I called, so I am turning to you guys.

    My first question is about the type of outlet I will be plugging this machine into. I understand this is a 110/120v machine and the type of plug on it is one that will plug into a regular household outlet (two parallel prongs) which I was under the impression that that is a 110v style outlet, 120v being the type with one sideways prong? So I was wondering if plugging this machine into a regular household outlet will limit the amount of amperage the machine can put out because it auto detects what type of outlet it is plugged into correct?. Someone also told me that in order to safely run this machine at the full 140 amp output I should have a 30 amp breaker connected to that outlet at the breaker box?

    Basically I just want to know how I can safely run this machine while it is putting out high amperage because if I am unable to run it to its full potential off the regular outlet then I have a 7500 watt generator with true 120v outlets on it that I can use.

    Second question is a bit less complicated, was just wondering if I can get a drive roll for this machine that can handle .035" mig wire?

    Thanks guys!

  2. #2

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    The prongs or outlet has nothing to do with 110v or 120v. The one sideways prong type limits you to a 20 amp outlet only. 110 or 120 volts is determined by your local power grid. You will get maximum performance on a 20 amp breaker.
    2013 250EX : SSC Pedal : I-MIG 250P 20' Profax gun : Power Plasma 60 p80 torch : 3M Speedglas 9100XX : Evolution Rage 3 DB cold saw

  3. Default

    They used to be referred to as 110v way back in the day and now they are typically closer to 120v. Should be no issues. Home outlets in North America are usually either 120v or 240v (not 110v or 220v). Good luck!

  4. #4

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    Many 20 amp plugs have both types of blades, vertical and horizontal on one leg. There is a lot of leeway in the wiring for welders since they are duty cycle limited. The NEC allows a lower amp plug and wire since the load is only 35% of the time maximum. It doesn't affect breaker size as much though.

  5. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by zoama View Post
    The prongs or outlet has nothing to do with 110v or 120v. The one sideways prong type limits you to a 20 amp outlet only. 110 or 120 volts is determined by your local power grid. You will get maximum performance on a 20 amp breaker.
    Got it, I was going to find the breaker that the outlet in my barn is on and check to make sure it is a 20 amp breaker, if it is then can I trust that the wiring going from the breaker to the outlet is enough to carry the load when the welder is at maximum amperage?

    Appreciate the info, thanks

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by esg612 View Post
    Got it, I was going to find the breaker that the outlet in my barn is on and check to make sure it is a 20 amp breaker, if it is then can I trust that the wiring going from the breaker to the outlet is enough to carry the load when the welder is at maximum amperage?

    Appreciate the info, thanks

    I would say yes given the duty cycle of the machine. I've never tripped a breaker with my little hobart.
    2013 250EX : SSC Pedal : I-MIG 250P 20' Profax gun : Power Plasma 60 p80 torch : 3M Speedglas 9100XX : Evolution Rage 3 DB cold saw

  7. #7

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    You'll need a 30 amp breaker.

  8. #8

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    Maybe my hobart transformer doesn't put out the amperage it claims. performance, in the above post is an Everlast tech while I'm just a hobby welder so always take the Everlast company advice over mine.
    2013 250EX : SSC Pedal : I-MIG 250P 20' Profax gun : Power Plasma 60 p80 torch : 3M Speedglas 9100XX : Evolution Rage 3 DB cold saw

  9. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by performance View Post
    You'll need a 30 amp breaker.
    This may be a question for my electrician but if it is a 20 amp breaker can I just switch the breaker out for a 30 amp? Or would that be pointless because the wire gauge going to the outlet is most likely for a 20 amp?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by esg612 View Post
    This may be a question for my electrician but if it is a 20 amp breaker can I just switch the breaker out for a 30 amp? Or would that be pointless because the wire gauge going to the outlet is most likely for a 20 amp?
    NO! do not just swap the breaker. As you said the wiring will be only rated to 20 amps. The breaker is to protect the wiring, not the load.

    You can go ahead and use that 20 amp circuit for welding at most power levels. You may trip the breaker on extended welds at max power, but you might not. Just try it and see before you decide to add a new circuit. A lot depends on the length of wiring and the voltage at the panel, and any other loads on that circuit. Try to have the welder be the only thing on that breaker when welding. Also keep in mind the duty cycle of your welder. You don't want to exceed that. 3.5 minutes welding, 6.5 minutes cool down at max power.
    Long arc, short arc, heliarc and in-the-dark!

  11. #11

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    If the outlet and circuit is only used for running the unit, it shouldn't hurt. In fact when running the unit only pulls about 20 amps, but the inrush is higher, so you have to have a larger breaker. Now with that said, the wire requirements ARE reduced per the NEC according to section 630.

  12. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by esg612 View Post
    Got it, I was going to find the breaker that the outlet in my barn is on and check to make sure it is a 20 amp breaker, if it is then can I trust that the wiring going from the breaker to the outlet is enough to carry the load when the welder is at maximum amperage?

    Appreciate the info, thanks
    If it helps, I have two 140e's and they will blow a 20amp circuit breaker. However, they have more power than the 180 lincoln and 190 hobart that I had before. The IGBT inverter circuitry gets a ton of power from 120v.
    Pete

  13. Default

    Same question here about a 140E. Optimal performance is stated at 30 amp. If I add a 30 amp breaker and 10 gauge wire to the power box, can I get by with a pigtail adapter on the welder or is it better to replace the welders plug with a 30 amp male plug?

    THX

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by thegoschman View Post
    Same question here about a 140E. Optimal performance is stated at 30 amp. If I add a 30 amp breaker and 10 gauge wire to the power box, can I get by with a pigtail adapter on the welder or is it better to replace the welders plug with a 30 amp male plug?

    THX
    It all depends. Lots of factors.
    How often you push the machine to it's max
    The quality and condition of the outlet.
    Cord length.
    Service voltage.
    Etc.
    For most applications the stock cord and plug will be fine. Install a high quality industrial dedicated 20A outlet and don't use any adapters or extensions you don't require, and you should be fine. Keep an eye on the plug and keep it clean. One thing that happens when pushing a plug hard, is that if it gets oxidized or dirty, that adds resistance and will create heat. Then the heat kills the spring tension in the outlet so it makes a worse connection and more resistance and heat. So a small problem can run away into a melted plug if ignored. This can even happen within spec, but will go faster when run over spec. Big A/C units are well known for cooking plugs and outlets. Just watch for any heat or discoloration on the blades and change out any suspect outlet before it gets out of control. If you take care of it, you won't have any problems. However, if you know you will beat on it pretty hard, or have a shop full of bozos that will be constantly plugging and unplugging it and kicking the cord around on the floor, it might be a good idea to change it out to a 30A plug.
    Long arc, short arc, heliarc and in-the-dark!

  15. Default

    Thanks for the info Rambozo. I'll leave it just as it is and see how it goes!

  16. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thegoschman View Post
    Thanks for the info Rambozo. I'll leave it just as it is and see how it goes!
    I'm using a 30amp breaker with 12 gauge to the outlet. In normal usage (30 seconds to 1 minute) the welder cord gets very slightly warm, but everything else is fine.

    Pete

  17. Default

    I'm using my already installed 30 amp RV plug with a adapter to the traditional 20A house style plug. I'm also using a 10 Gauge 25 foot extension cord to move it around on my garage. Since the ground clamp is on the short side.

    And yes I realize this thread isn't very current.

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