Share
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Procon Carbonator Cooler Project for 250EX

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    5
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Procon Carbonator Cooler Project for 250EX

    I have had my 250EX for over a year and finally got around to building a cooler for it (still no cart, but that's next on the agenda). I can't believe I took so long to get this done.
    I have been using a WP-17 and WP-9 torch until now and I am looking forward to doing some extended welding sessions without toasting my hands or taking long breaks to cool things down.
    This was a fun project. Like many others, I elected to use a carbonator as the basis for the design, with the stainless steel tank used as a reservoir.
    I owe a huge debt of gratitude to many of the fine people that have posted their solutions on this forum and elsewhere. It helped immensely.
    The Procon pump on my unit is rated 125GPH and 250PSI. With that in mind, I decided not to adjust the internal bypass relief valve in the Procon pump.
    It is not recommended by the Manufacturer and creates excessive heat build up of the coolant by short circuiting the flow internally within the pump.
    Instead, I split the output from the pump, with one 3/8 line directed back into the tank, utilizing an inline ball valve to adjust the pressure.
    The other side of the split output goes to the torch water supply, with an in-line pressure gauge.
    I installed a cheap (< $4 ) but effective 12V digital thermostat (photo attached) that I picked up on eBay to monitor the temperature of the tank coolant.
    Speaking of coolant, I elected to go with a 60/40 mix of distilled water and low silicate auto anti freeze (my welder sits in an unheated garage here in Canada). There will be many who would caution against that choice, but I have done extensive research on this. There are lots of people that have been using ethylene glycol and distilled water for years with no issues. I am not buying into the hype over clogged torch cavities caused by leak sealants in the anti freeze. Each to his own. I have a clear hose that leads from the power cable water return Dinse connector to the input on the cooler. If I start to see deposits or film building on the inside of that hose, I will change coolant. Until then, the green antifreeze is colour coordinated with the Everlast 250EX case!
    I circulate the return from the torch through a 7 x 12 transmission cooler. I fabed an air plenum from a piece of 28 gauge sheet metal from Home Depot (it was actually an air plenum end cap).
    I am using one 5 inch 120 CFM 12V cooling fan to draw air through the transmission cooler. The exhaust air blows directly onto the coolant tank and pump motor which seems to really assist in keeping things cool.
    At first, I hooked up the WP-18 torch that came with the 250EX. Even with the pressure dialed down to 25 PSI, I was getting a flow rate of in excess of 2 litres per minute.
    Once I hooked up the WP-20 torch, I had to adjust the pressure up to 45 PSI to get a flow rate of 1 Litre per minute. The smaller coolant path on the WP-20 torch really restricts the flow rate.
    The digital thermostat is really a nice convenience and it helps to monitor the rate of temperature rise when the pump is operating.
    Bottom line, this thing works great and is much quieter than the 250EX fan motor.
    I like that I built it myself and if any component fails for whatever reason, I can replace it and get back to welding in short order.
    Regarding the 250EX, I had some anxiety when I chose to go with the unit, but after using it for a year, the anxiety has been replaced with satisfaction. It has been a solid performer. Well done Everlast!Attachment 12872Attachment 12871Attachment 12873Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2604.jpg 
Views:	1315 
Size:	140.1 KB 
ID:	12874Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2616.jpg 
Views:	594 
Size:	142.2 KB 
ID:	12875Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2610.jpg 
Views:	915 
Size:	143.0 KB 
ID:	12876Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2608.jpg 
Views:	678 
Size:	143.1 KB 
ID:	12877Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2613.jpg 
Views:	527 
Size:	137.4 KB 
ID:	12878Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2612.jpg 
Views:	1012 
Size:	144.0 KB 
ID:	12879Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2607.jpg 
Views:	793 
Size:	143.3 KB 
ID:	12880Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2605.jpg 
Views:	814 
Size:	143.1 KB 
ID:	12881

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Disneyland
    Posts
    2,659

    Default

    Very nice cooler. Maybe when you get to the cart phase, you will want to rotate some of the cooler components to make the width more equal to the welder's? I guess there is an issue of HF leakage with some types of coolant, but like you, I have been using automotive coolant for decades with no problems.
    Long arc, short arc, heliarc and in-the-dark!

  3. #3

    Default

    More vertical mods can thin it out some. My bernard as the tank (flat tank) on the bottom.

    Nice work, looks nice. How bad was the wallet hit. I know my percon alone was like $90 when it died on me..

    We have one wide cart and we can store tungsten, cups, lenses, etc on the side of the welder. And months down the road we find ton of extra consumables under the welder.
    Mike R.
    Email: admineverlast@everlastwelders.com
    www.everlastgenerators.com
    www.everlastwelders.com
    877-755-9353 x203
    M-F 12 - 7PM PST
    FYI: PP50, PP80, IMIG-200, IMIG-250P, 210EXT and 255EXT.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    5
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by everlastsupport View Post
    More vertical mods can thin it out some. My bernard as the tank (flat tank) on the bottom.

    Nice work, looks nice. How bad was the wallet hit. I know my percon alone was like $90 when it died on me..

    We have one wide cart and we can store tungsten, cups, lenses, etc on the side of the welder. And months down the road we find ton of extra consumables under the welder.

    Thanks for the feedback
    Cost wise, the whole thing came out around $250, broken down as follows
    - carbonator (eBay) $100
    - Transmission Cooler (ebay) $30
    - 120 CFM 5 Inch 12V DC Cooling Fan (eBay) $12
    - Quick Connect Fittings (River-Weld) $20
    - Brass Fittings (Home Depot) $50
    - Brass Ball Valve $5
    - PVC Hoses $10
    - Pressure Gauge (eBay) $10
    - Digital Thermostat (eBay) $4
    - 12V DC Power Supply (Left Over) $5
    - Miscellaneous Metal /Fasteners $10
    Last edited by Mikey52; 02-07-2015 at 01:46 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Canada, Suttonwest, Ontario
    Posts
    676

    Default

    Mikey52 you did a nice job on the pump and I like the idea of a temp gauge I might get one and put it on my W300 just to see how hot it dose get.
    I gave up on the Procon pumps after I bought my first Everlast welder and got the Everlast W300 SST pump mod a few pump over the years because I got pump new and cheap at flee markets still a some brand new pumps. The motor is the same one I have had for over 30 years but only get 8 to 10 years out of a pump.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	mod pump.jpg 
Views:	343 
Size:	77.5 KB 
ID:	12901Click image for larger version. 

Name:	pump failures.jpg 
Views:	409 
Size:	75.3 KB 
ID:	12902
    On the last pump I made, the pump did not have a bypass so I had to make one, I just used a old bypass fuel system I had around with a one-way valve on it and just keep making a restriction hole to let the coolant return to the suction side of the pump, keep drill it big and big till the coolant pressure was right.
    Everlast PowerTig 325EXT (Canada)
    Everlast Power I Mig 250 (Canada)
    Everlast PowerPlasma 80S (Canada)
    Everlast PowerCool W300 (Canada)
    Everlast PowerMTS 250S Fitted with a 30A Spoolgun(Canada)
    Miller Dynasty 400 wireless(Canada)
    Millermatic 252 plus 30A Spoolgun(Canada)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    5
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kempy View Post
    Mikey52 you did a nice job on the pump and I like the idea of a temp gauge I might get one and put it on my W300 just to see how hot it dose get.
    I gave up on the Procon pumps after I bought my first Everlast welder and got the Everlast W300 SST pump mod a few pump over the years because I got pump new and cheap at flee markets still a some brand new pumps. The motor is the same one I have had for over 30 years but only get 8 to 10 years out of a pump.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	mod pump.jpg 
Views:	343 
Size:	77.5 KB 
ID:	12901Click image for larger version. 

Name:	pump failures.jpg 
Views:	409 
Size:	75.3 KB 
ID:	12902
    On the last pump I made, the pump did not have a bypass so I had to make one, I just used a old bypass fuel system I had around with a one-way valve on it and just keep making a restriction hole to let the coolant return to the suction side of the pump, keep drill it big and big till the coolant pressure was right.
    Thanks for the feedback Kempy
    If you are looking for the thermostat, you can find them here
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/DC12V-Heat-C...item43d5f85a31
    Cheers

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mikey52 View Post
    Thanks for the feedback
    Cost wise, the whole thing came out around $250, broken down as follows
    - carbonator (eBay) $100
    - Transmission Cooler (ebay) $30
    - 120 CFM 5 Inch 12V DC Cooling Fan (eBay) $12
    - Quick Connect Fittings (River-Weld) $20
    - Brass Fittings (Home Depot) $50
    - Brass Ball Valve $5
    - PVC Hoses $10
    - Pressure Gauge (eBay) $10
    - Digital Thermostat (eBay) $4
    - 12V DC Power Supply (Left Over) $5
    - Miscellaneous Metal /Fasteners $10
    That is not bad. The one I had listed for over $1000, you have they same unit, thought a little wide. That is a good savings. I had mine up for sale, $300 was about as high as people would pay. Maybe I will put it back in action.

    That is a quality unit you made.
    Mike R.
    Email: admineverlast@everlastwelders.com
    www.everlastgenerators.com
    www.everlastwelders.com
    877-755-9353 x203
    M-F 12 - 7PM PST
    FYI: PP50, PP80, IMIG-200, IMIG-250P, 210EXT and 255EXT.

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mikey52 View Post
    I have had my 250EX for over a year and finally got around to building a cooler for it (still no cart, but that's next on the agenda). I can't believe I took so long to get this done.
    I have been using a WP-17 and WP-9 torch until now and I am looking forward to doing some extended welding sessions without toasting my hands or taking long breaks to cool things down.
    This was a fun project. Like many others, I elected to use a carbonator as the basis for the design, with the stainless steel tank used as a reservoir.
    I owe a huge debt of gratitude to many of the fine people that have posted their solutions on this forum and elsewhere. It helped immensely.
    The Procon pump on my unit is rated 125GPH and 250PSI. With that in mind, I decided not to adjust the internal bypass relief valve in the Procon pump.
    It is not recommended by the Manufacturer and creates excessive heat build up of the coolant by short circuiting the flow internally within the pump.
    Instead, I split the output from the pump, with one 3/8 line directed back into the tank, utilizing an inline ball valve to adjust the pressure.
    The other side of the split output goes to the torch water supply, with an in-line pressure gauge.
    I installed a cheap (< $4 ) but effective 12V digital thermostat (photo attached) that I picked up on eBay to monitor the temperature of the tank coolant.
    Speaking of coolant, I elected to go with a 60/40 mix of distilled water and low silicate auto anti freeze (my welder sits in an unheated garage here in Canada). There will be many who would caution against that choice, but I have done extensive research on this. There are lots of people that have been using ethylene glycol and distilled water for years with no issues. I am not buying into the hype over clogged torch cavities caused by leak sealants in the anti freeze. Each to his own. I have a clear hose that leads from the power cable water return Dinse connector to the input on the cooler. If I start to see deposits or film building on the inside of that hose, I will change coolant. Until then, the green antifreeze is colour coordinated with the Everlast 250EX case!
    I circulate the return from the torch through a 7 x 12 transmission cooler. I fabed an air plenum from a piece of 28 gauge sheet metal from Home Depot (it was actually an air plenum end cap).
    I am using one 5 inch 120 CFM 12V cooling fan to draw air through the transmission cooler. The exhaust air blows directly onto the coolant tank and pump motor which seems to really assist in keeping things cool.
    At first, I hooked up the WP-18 torch that came with the 250EX. Even with the pressure dialed down to 25 PSI, I was getting a flow rate of in excess of 2 litres per minute.
    Once I hooked up the WP-20 torch, I had to adjust the pressure up to 45 PSI to get a flow rate of 1 Litre per minute. The smaller coolant path on the WP-20 torch really restricts the flow rate.
    The digital thermostat is really a nice convenience and it helps to monitor the rate of temperature rise when the pump is operating.
    Bottom line, this thing works great and is much quieter than the 250EX fan motor.
    I like that I built it myself and if any component fails for whatever reason, I can replace it and get back to welding in short order.
    Regarding the 250EX, I had some anxiety when I chose to go with the unit, but after using it for a year, the anxiety has been replaced with satisfaction. It has been a solid performer. Well done Everlast!Attachment 12872Attachment 12871Attachment 12873Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2604.jpg 
Views:	1315 
Size:	140.1 KB 
ID:	12874Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2616.jpg 
Views:	594 
Size:	142.2 KB 
ID:	12875Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2610.jpg 
Views:	915 
Size:	143.0 KB 
ID:	12876Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2608.jpg 
Views:	678 
Size:	143.1 KB 
ID:	12877Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2613.jpg 
Views:	527 
Size:	137.4 KB 
ID:	12878Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2612.jpg 
Views:	1012 
Size:	144.0 KB 
ID:	12879Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2607.jpg 
Views:	793 
Size:	143.3 KB 
ID:	12880Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2605.jpg 
Views:	814 
Size:	143.1 KB 
ID:	12881
    Thanks for posting this. If possible, can you give us some additional info on the Procon carbonator.

    thanks
    imig 200
    PowerTig 210 EXT

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Disneyland
    Posts
    2,659

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by johnnymg View Post
    Thanks for posting this. If possible, can you give us some additional info on the Procon carbonator.

    thanks
    Look on ebay, they are all over the place. Also you might find a good used one at a local restaurant supply. Quite a few commercial TIG coolers use the same pump. They are available with a wide range of adjustable pressure relief valves, so you can get one set to run at the pressures and flow rates you need. You do want to run a spring type relief valve, not just an orifice. Either the Procon built-in or an external bypass returning to the tank. Depending on the motor you get, some are dual shaft so you can mount your fan to the other shaft to make for a nice compact package.
    Long arc, short arc, heliarc and in-the-dark!

Similar Threads

  1. Procon Pump for Water Cooler
    By cbmkr in forum Buy, Sale or Trade
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-20-2013, 02:40 PM
  2. Using a Carbonator pump/Tank for a TIG Cooler
    By Odyknuck in forum TIG Welding (GTAW/GTAW-P)
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-17-2012, 03:25 PM
  3. DIY Cooler: Procon fitting
    By DaveO in forum TIG Welding (GTAW/GTAW-P)
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 08-22-2012, 12:50 AM
  4. 250ex & water cooler
    By toolman in forum TIG Welding (GTAW/GTAW-P)
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-21-2010, 03:18 PM
  5. powertig 250ex with water cooler problem
    By DisWeld in forum TIG Welding (GTAW/GTAW-P)
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 04-12-2010, 11:29 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •