Share
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 59

Thread: Welding cart advice?

  1. #21

    Default

    Just put a cross brace for your bottle to sit on. Then just add the screen over it for looks.
    Gerald

    Millermatic 251
    Spectrum 300 Plasma
    Everlast PowerTig 250EX
    Everlast PowerCool W300
    Harris / Victor OA
    Craftsman 13 Speed Drill Press
    ProTools Air/Hydraulic Bender
    48" Brake, 72" Brake, 52" Stomp Shear
    Mitler Bros. 36" High Throat Bead Roller
    Compressor, Notchers, Grinders, etc.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Disneyland
    Posts
    2,659

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Elantramax1 View Post
    The Beave suggested I use an Open grate style shelf. I found a 13 Gauge, 3/4" one at Tractor Supply. And a cheaper one at HD. The one at HD is 1/2" spacing. And it states .125" which tells me 1/8". These are 12" x 24" pieces. Which would work for the two upper shelves. Not sure if I want to Trust that for under the weight of the Tank. I am thinking about the two at HD. Would get me started. The bottom one would be welded on last.
    There are both good and bad points to that material. It's nice that the shelves don't catch crud and give plenty of cooling ventilation. However, you can't set things like contact tips or other small items on them. Also depending on foot placement and size, on some equipment a foot will fall through the openings, so it will rock around and not be stable. Of course sometimes all the feet will line up and fall through so the item will be really locked in, something you just have to play around with. Some material has punched holes and is pretty much smooth and flat, while others are expanded metal, so there are slits cut, then the metal is pulled open. That ends up real strong, and great traction, but it can be a little rough, and is an uneven surface. It's all up to what you want. The bottle shelf doesn't need to be thick as long as it is attached all the way around. It's a great place for a grate. If using chains, it's good to keep the bottle from moving around at the bottom. Keeps it sliding out and or hitting the wheels. Depending on size, an easy way to get that, is to put your bottle shelf under the frame, so the bottle fits inside the frame. I prefer ratchet straps instead of chains anymore, so nothing moves around anyway. There are as many cart designs as there are people that make them. Just use what makes sense for your situation. I made one cart with just two rolled rings welded on so you just dropped the bottle in the rings, and no attachment was needed. Super secure and easy to swap bottles. That limited me to one bottle size, but I wanted that cart to roll under a bench, so I always used a small bottle on it anyway.
    Long arc, short arc, heliarc and in-the-dark!

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Trenton, New Jersey, United States
    Posts
    263

    Default

    HD lied. It is actually 18 gauge. Too thin for what I need. I'm going to return it. I may just use my original idea of 16 Gauge shelves. Solid pieces

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Trenton, New Jersey, United States
    Posts
    263

    Default

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0020.jpg 
Views:	146 
Size:	149.6 KB 
ID:	12401Couldn't wait to start

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Trenton, New Jersey, United States
    Posts
    263

    Default

    Met the BeaveClick image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0021.jpg 
Views:	187 
Size:	136.5 KB 
ID:	12402. And this is where we are in the Project.
    Thanks Matt.

  6. #26

    Default

    You're welcome, Chris! I hope I was useful.
    Not so obvious and ruthlessly odd.

    My fabrication blog:
    Beaver Built

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Trenton, New Jersey, United States
    Posts
    263

    Default

    Thanks again Matt!! I see I have a bit more to learn. Guess I know what I am doing next weekend.

    I am thinking that when I make the Top, I should use a Third bar. In the middle to help support the weight of the welder. I have enough scrap to make one more. What do you think?

    Thanks
    Elantramax1
    Last edited by Elantramax1; 10-06-2014 at 10:03 PM.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Trenton, New Jersey, United States
    Posts
    263

    Default

    I started welding on the Middle Shelf. Figured it would be easier to do this now. Tried doing a Spot Weld. I had the Blue spots on the backside of the Shelf. But not in the Tubing underneath. Just doing a Filet on the outside. Maybe on the inside as well when I am done.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Disneyland
    Posts
    2,659

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Elantramax1 View Post
    I started welding on the Middle Shelf. Figured it would be easier to do this now. Tried doing a Spot Weld. I had the Blue spots on the backside of the Shelf. But not in the Tubing underneath. Just doing a Filet on the outside. Maybe on the inside as well when I am done.
    What you wanted was a rosette weld. They end up as an almost invisible weld for sheet metal MIG after a little touch with a flap disc.
    Long arc, short arc, heliarc and in-the-dark!

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Trenton, New Jersey, United States
    Posts
    263

    Default

    That's what I meant. Problem was it wasn't going through the sheet metal. Even with the Volts all the way up.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Disneyland
    Posts
    2,659

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Elantramax1 View Post
    That's what I meant. Problem was it wasn't going through the sheet metal. Even with the Volts all the way up.
    To do a rosette weld, you have to start with a hole in the sheetmetal, drilled, punched, plasma cut, etc. Everlast has a pretty good example in one of their trailer hitch videos as I recall.
    To do a spot weld or resistance weld, you typically use two contact electrodes and a different type of power supply.
    Long arc, short arc, heliarc and in-the-dark!

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Trenton, New Jersey, United States
    Posts
    263

    Default

    Thanks. At least I get to practice some beads. The Self was slightly larger than the frame. Grinder will fix that.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Trenton, New Jersey, United States
    Posts
    263

    Default

    Have a good chuckle. I know I am.Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0023.jpg 
Views:	162 
Size:	145.3 KB 
ID:	12405Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0022.jpg 
Views:	168 
Size:	142.4 KB 
ID:	12406

  14. #34

    Default

    All you needed was a few tack welds on that self to hold it in place.
    Gerald

    Millermatic 251
    Spectrum 300 Plasma
    Everlast PowerTig 250EX
    Everlast PowerCool W300
    Harris / Victor OA
    Craftsman 13 Speed Drill Press
    ProTools Air/Hydraulic Bender
    48" Brake, 72" Brake, 52" Stomp Shear
    Mitler Bros. 36" High Throat Bead Roller
    Compressor, Notchers, Grinders, etc.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Trenton, New Jersey, United States
    Posts
    263

    Default

    It doesn't rattle. Today I added an additional support bar to the top shelf. Once I put the 16 gauge sheet metal on, Should be plenty strong for the weight of the welder. Even with the 8" Roll.

    The Rosette Weld. What size hole should I drill in the sheet metal? 1/8"?

    Thanks

  16. #36

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Elantramax1 View Post
    It doesn't rattle. Today I added an additional support bar to the top shelf. Once I put the 16 gauge sheet metal on, Should be plenty strong for the weight of the welder. Even with the 8" Roll.

    The Rosette Weld. What size hole should I drill in the sheet metal? 1/8"?

    Thanks
    3/16 to 1/4" would be better. You want the weld to start on the base metal. I always called it a plug weld.
    2013 250EX : SSC Pedal : I-MIG 250P 20' Profax gun : Power Plasma 60 p80 torch : 3M Speedglas 9100XX : Evolution Rage 3 DB cold saw

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Trenton, New Jersey, United States
    Posts
    263

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by zoama View Post
    3/16 to 1/4" would be better. You want the weld to start on the base metal. I always called it a plug weld.
    Thanks Zoama. I "Tested" the welds. Lifted the unit by pressing on the underside of the top shelf. It holds. Ended up with a couple low spots.

    I went into this knowing it wasn't going to be perfect. Its going to end up looking like "Cr*p"

  18. #38

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Elantramax1 View Post
    Ended up with a couple low spots.
    The good thing about steel is that you can put more on and grind it down flush... if that makes you happy. Some people will say things like "only cats cover up their crap" but snobbish comments don't bother me, I'm not working for them.
    If you're looking for a good flap wheel, these are what I use http://www.cometsupply.com/mp/PFERD/pm/PFE60626/ They cut very fast and last a long time. The difference between PFERD and the cheap ones is like night and day.
    2013 250EX : SSC Pedal : I-MIG 250P 20' Profax gun : Power Plasma 60 p80 torch : 3M Speedglas 9100XX : Evolution Rage 3 DB cold saw

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Trenton, New Jersey, United States
    Posts
    263

    Default

    Just welded together two 3" wide pieces of 1/8" flat steel. Blasted the one side so hot, It warped the table a little. Flipped it over. Welded the other side. Polished the one side down. Today I was curious as to how well the weld is. Laid it across two pieces of plywood. And stood on it. The 1/8" plate bowed under my 140 Lbs. But the welds seem to hold. Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Plate 1.jpg 
Views:	155 
Size:	141.8 KB 
ID:	12442Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Plate 2.jpg 
Views:	142 
Size:	143.9 KB 
ID:	12443

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Trenton, New Jersey, United States
    Posts
    263

    Default

    Right now. I finished welding the cart. Sanded it down. Note: Don't buy HF brand Sand Paper. Garbage doesn't last. Even with hand use. And I use the one listed for Metal. Sprayed a coating of Rustoleum Primer on the top and sides. Waiting for it to dry before I spray underneath. Haven't decided on a color. Maybe a Medium Gray?

Similar Threads

  1. Welding Cart - Power Cart 250 - opinions?
    By ScottRussell in forum Multi-Process Units (TIG,Stick,Plasma/MIG,TIG,Stick Combo units)
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-05-2012, 01:19 PM
  2. First Welding Project - You guessed it... a welding cart
    By EmptyNester in forum Hobyist Projects
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 10-12-2011, 03:30 PM
  3. Advice on Welding HF Trailer Kit
    By EmptyNester in forum General Welding Questions
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 09-23-2011, 11:01 AM
  4. Welding cart
    By Titan winch in forum Other Custom Fabrications
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 01-03-2010, 02:50 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •