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Thread: 1946 Ford Coupe project

  1. Default 1946 Ford Coupe project

    I've been involved with many forms of racing most of my life. Started with Motocross, moved onto Kart racing, now into building street rods as a hobby. Built a 1948 Anglia from the ground up for my first real build. Sold it, to radical for the street, to slow for the track Family grew made the decision to sell easier. Now I'm deep into another build, 1946 Ford Coupe, tube chassis, 496 BB. Being involved with a Nostalgia Nitro front engine rail has got the need for speed boiling once again. Looking forward to working with my new PT200DX!!!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
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    Without pictures... didn't happen

    Let's see some shots! I miss working on cars and trucks sometimes, kinda got the itch right after I traded my 72 GMC last year. It had sat for near two years without being touched and a trade for an old ironhead sporty came up almost as a joke, next thing I knew, truck was gone and I was back to bikes only.
    Trip Bauer
    Former USN HT
    Everlast 200DX New Model
    Hobart Handler 125 MIG
    Van Norman #12
    Atlas 12" engine lathe
    '98 RoadKing - 84 Ironhead - 59 Ironhead

  3. Default

    Here are a couple shots.

    Tire fitment.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Door bars
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    Once teh chassis work is done, the next phase is re-paint. The paint is 25+ years old, still in great shape but that color went out in teh 80's.

    It will be black with bright red leather interior, all the stock trim and bumpers. Also building a 496 BB. I thought this build would be faster than when I built my Anglia, but isn't turning out that way.

    The Anglia was my first ground up build.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Everlast PowerTig 200DX
    Miller 120 Mig

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    Here's the shot of teh trunck area.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Everlast PowerTig 200DX
    Miller 120 Mig

  5. #5

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    Very nice. Keep the project pictures coming. Looks like an expensive hobby, but that is a cool looking ride. I kill the dup picture for you.
    Mike R.
    Email: admineverlast@everlastwelders.com
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    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	9126Some additional progress images.
    Some days it feel like I don't get anything accomplished.

    Waiting for the CK 130 amp torch to arrive and get more practice time on the 200DX, really love that machine.
    Everlast PowerTig 200DX
    Miller 120 Mig

  7. #7

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    I too enjoy the hobby of cars and you have very nice ones. The 496 is a good choice. My girlfriends father just had a 496 BB built with roller rockers, mild cam, 9.0:1 wedge pistons and some other small goodies. Motor put down 611hp and pretty high TQ but I don't remember the numbers exactly. It wasn't dropped into a car like yours but rather a 73 chevelle. I am looking forward to seeing some more from your projects.
    Jason
    Everlast 255EXT - Perfection
    Everlast PowerPro 256 - UPS Demolished
    Everlast MTS200s
    12 Ton Shop Press
    DeWalt Hand Tools/ChopSaw

  8. #8

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    Are you running chromoly tubes in the chassis?
    What are your plans with the body?
    -------------------------------------------
    Spike Customs, Inc.
    Fresno, CA 93727
    ph- 559-549-RIDE(7433)
    -------------------------------------------
    -Follow me on twitter!-

  9. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Spike View Post
    Are you running chromoly tubes in the chassis?
    What are your plans with the body?
    All of the round tube is chrome moly.

    The body is going to stay as stock as possible, with all the factory trim.


    Plans are to repaint in black base coat/clear coat. The body fortunately is very straight.


    I've been visiting the chevelle sites, a ton of information on 496 BB builds.
    Everlast PowerTig 200DX
    Miller 120 Mig

  10. #10

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    496 bbc... Nice.
    Is it a new one or a punched out 454? You can make some serious power out of those things, especially if you're going the forced induction route. they're still pretty reliable as long as you don't loose your head when designing and building them. I've known people with 1000-1100HP 496s that could still drive them on the street.
    -------------------------------------------
    Spike Customs, Inc.
    Fresno, CA 93727
    ph- 559-549-RIDE(7433)
    -------------------------------------------
    -Follow me on twitter!-

  11. #11

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    My girlfriends dads is built to run on the street. I believe there is more than one way to build the 496.. Don't all 496's start out as a 454. This one I speak of was a punch 454 with a stroker crank to get to 496.

    OP: Do you have more details of the motor build?
    Jason
    Everlast 255EXT - Perfection
    Everlast PowerPro 256 - UPS Demolished
    Everlast MTS200s
    12 Ton Shop Press
    DeWalt Hand Tools/ChopSaw

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason View Post
    My girlfriends dads is built to run on the street. I believe there is more than one way to build the 496.. Don't all 496's start out as a 454. This one I speak of was a punch 454 with a stroker crank to get to 496.

    OP: Do you have more details of the motor build?
    if you make the 496 yourself its a punched out 454, but GM sells a performance 496 block straight out of the box.
    -------------------------------------------
    Spike Customs, Inc.
    Fresno, CA 93727
    ph- 559-549-RIDE(7433)
    -------------------------------------------
    -Follow me on twitter!-

  13. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Spike View Post
    496 bbc... Nice.
    Is it a new one or a punched out 454? You can make some serious power out of those things, especially if you're going the forced induction route. they're still pretty reliable as long as you don't loose your head when designing and building them. I've known people with 1000-1100HP 496s that could still drive them on the street.
    I started out with a 454.

    So far, the block has been hone lined, and bored 50 over.

    Will bore to final 60 over when I get the pistons and rods.


    I bought a new Linatti crank.

    The plan is to go mild and pump gas friendly. The goal is to have it streetable, with limited strip time.

    The guy doing the machine work has dropped the ball and hasn't touched it in years. Wasn't an issue (until now) as I was working on the chassis.

    Now that the chassis is getting very close to being finished, I need the motor for the next phase of the build.

    Never had a Big Block in a car, all small blocks, I've been told once you go big block, you won't mess with a small block anymore.

    The plan for the build is to have a super straight black stock appearing body, with a pro stock style chassis and a ground pounder motor.

    Interior is going to be red leather with red carpet, gloss black cage and dash with white face Auto Meter comp gauges.

    Thought about going fuel injected, but will need to learn more on that. So for now, it will be a 850 holley on a edelbrock airgap manifold, 3.5 inch full length exhaust.

    I can picture it in my head, and hear it in my mind, just need to get it done
    Everlast PowerTig 200DX
    Miller 120 Mig

  14. #14

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    Sounds like it is going to be built similar to the motor I was referencing. The nice thing about the 496 is the large TQ numbers that follow with it.
    Jason
    Everlast 255EXT - Perfection
    Everlast PowerPro 256 - UPS Demolished
    Everlast MTS200s
    12 Ton Shop Press
    DeWalt Hand Tools/ChopSaw

  15. #15

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    This well be a good build to follow, I think.

    on a car that's going to have a lot of tuning done to it, and lots of part swapping, a carburetor is about the easiest way to go. Its a lots easier and cheaper to swap some jets and adjust your idle mix than to have some one write a custom fuel map for you every time you swap parts. and if you're planning on making some big dyno numbers, the price for those high flow fuel rails and injector setups get to be more expensive than the best carburetors.
    The downside is that carburetors are picky. And can be a bear in cold or foul weather.
    -------------------------------------------
    Spike Customs, Inc.
    Fresno, CA 93727
    ph- 559-549-RIDE(7433)
    -------------------------------------------
    -Follow me on twitter!-

  16. Default

    You can make your own fuel rail if you're good with your welder. A length of 1 inch tube with some smaller tubes welded into it makes a fine fuel rail for super high flow rate. Just need a lathe to turn the stand-offs to the right internal diameter for whatever fuel injectors you're using. We made a few of our own in college for the SAE car.
    Poewr I-Mig 205P
    Powertig 185

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spike View Post
    on a car that's going to have a lot of tuning done to it, and lots of part swapping, a carburetor is about the easiest way to go. Its a lots easier and cheaper to swap some jets and adjust your idle mix than to have some one write a custom fuel map for you every time you swap parts. and if you're planning on making some big dyno numbers, the price for those high flow fuel rails and injector setups get to be more expensive than the best carburetors.
    The downside is that carburetors are picky. And can be a bear in cold or foul weather.
    Easy is relative. It all depends on what you are doing yourself or having others do. Typing a number into a computer to adjust a fuel curve, compared to removing a float bowl and swapping out a jet, not to mention having to go buy said jet if you don't have it. So cost and labor is relative. If you do almost everything yourself it is just how much you value your own time. If you send out all your work, it's how much someone else values their time.
    Also many changes that would require re-jetting a carb, will be automatically compensated for by a good fuel injection system.
    But yes in building from scratch, FI will cost more than a carb, no doubt about it.
    My favorite quote on that is one attributed to Russ Collins; "Speed is just a question of money. How fast can your wallet go?"
    Long arc, short arc, heliarc and in-the-dark!

  18. Default

    Rambozo,

    yes, that is a great quote.

    I enjoy the build process, once the build portions are done, I get lazy

    One of my biggest problems are my own expectations of my work. I hang out with the very best fabricators, watch what Troy and Chip do and the level of the quality they achieve.

    I push for the same level and usually end up frustrated that I'm not even close to their abilities. Granted, I don't have their list of equipment, or the talented members on their team.

    I feel we all push to do our absolute best, but understand at some point, the project needs to move forward or it will never be completed. I've started over with so many pieces that didn't pass my quality check, each time making it marginally better. Mistakes are what we learn from. I know my work won't be to the pro level, as long as I'm comfortable saying "I did it" that has been my gauge lately. Being a perfectionist is a downer
    Everlast PowerTig 200DX
    Miller 120 Mig

  19. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rambozo View Post
    Easy is relative. It all depends on what you are doing yourself or having others do. Typing a number into a computer to adjust a fuel curve, compared to removing a float bowl and swapping out a jet, not to mention having to go buy said jet if you don't have it. So cost and labor is relative. If you do almost everything yourself it is just how much you value your own time. If you send out all your work, it's how much someone else values their time.
    Also many changes that would require re-jetting a carb, will be automatically compensated for by a good fuel injection system.
    But yes in building from scratch, FI will cost more than a carb, no doubt about it.
    My favorite quote on that is one attributed to Russ Collins; "Speed is just a question of money. How fast can your wallet go?"
    The main cost of adjusting a carb is jets and time. The main cost of adjusting FI is a dyno. You can figure out the right jets on a carb by installing them and taking it for a ride, reading the plugs, and just the smell of the exhaust. I would imagine you could get a carb to 95% correct without equipment except new jets and some time. Tuning a fuel injection system almost requires a dyno. Hitting every box in a fuel/throttle curve, even with a simple 10 step map would be almost impossible on the street, and definitely not legal. So getting a carb to run well takes a weekend, a case of beer, and maybe 100 bucks in jets. Hooking up a FI car just to see whats its doing takes about 25 grand to buy a dyno.
    Poewr I-Mig 205P
    Powertig 185

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by agent4573 View Post
    The main cost of adjusting a carb is jets and time. The main cost of adjusting FI is a dyno. You can figure out the right jets on a carb by installing them and taking it for a ride, reading the plugs, and just the smell of the exhaust. I would imagine you could get a carb to 95% correct without equipment except new jets and some time. Tuning a fuel injection system almost requires a dyno. Hitting every box in a fuel/throttle curve, even with a simple 10 step map would be almost impossible on the street, and definitely not legal. So getting a carb to run well takes a weekend, a case of beer, and maybe 100 bucks in jets. Hooking up a FI car just to see whats its doing takes about 25 grand to buy a dyno.
    You can get a good base tune on the street and you could probably get a tune worth keeping with the proper logging setup but maintaining the environment of legal will be an issue as you change the higher end of the curves. You can however get a base tune on the street and then pay for some dyno time allowing you to dial in the tune. There are even standalone management systems that will get a base tune just by you driving it on the street. These may not be the best but it could be a starting point.
    Jason
    Everlast 255EXT - Perfection
    Everlast PowerPro 256 - UPS Demolished
    Everlast MTS200s
    12 Ton Shop Press
    DeWalt Hand Tools/ChopSaw

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