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Thread: Project 3 from CGCINC. Category: Decorative Metal art

  1. #1

    Default Project 3 from CGCINC. Category: Decorative Metal art

    I wanted to try out my new Plasma cutter so I decided to cut some flames.
    After a little more thought, I decided to make a shelf for my garage with a flame back piece.
    I used some Aluminum sheet I had left over from a job, I'm think it is .094 thickness.
    I used my PP50 plasma cutter and my EX250 TIG to weld it.

    I found out that flames are not as easy to draw as I thought.
    I spent probably an hour drawing and wiping off different flames till I finally settled with what I have.





    Straight edge for Plasma cutting...


    Drill holes...


    Clamp down the thick bar stock to bend the sides and front...




    cut flames....





    Weld up and use tool box liner for the bottom of the shelf!


    PowerTig 250EX
    Power I-MIG 200
    Power Plasma 50
    It's what you learn, After you know it all, that counts!

  2. #2
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    Very nice. Bridging the gap between metal art and shop equipment. How hard was it to clean up the edges of the flames, as compared to the hole saw holes? With a guide I guess those could have been plasma cut, too. Or would that have been made more cleanup work than it saved?
    Long arc, short arc, heliarc and in-the-dark!

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rambozo View Post
    Very nice. Bridging the gap between metal art and shop equipment. How hard was it to clean up the edges of the flames, as compared to the hole saw holes? With a guide I guess those could have been plasma cut, too. Or would that have been made more cleanup work than it saved?
    The flames were pretty easy to clean up with a few files, maybe 20-30 minutes of screwin around. The hole saw did a decent job, I think the plasma would have made more work even with a template or guide. I wanted to see how easy....or hard it was to free hand something like flames. It definitely would take some practice to get smooth and straight cuts.
    PowerTig 250EX
    Power I-MIG 200
    Power Plasma 50
    It's what you learn, After you know it all, that counts!

  4. #4

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    Pretty nice job, The flames give it a custom cool look, you just can't buy things like that.Now you have started letting you mind wonder around there's no telling what else you might build.Keep on Designing and fabricating things.
    PowerTig 200DX
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  5. #5

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    A couple pics of it mounted....



    PowerTig 250EX
    Power I-MIG 200
    Power Plasma 50
    It's what you learn, After you know it all, that counts!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    Cool! You have a knack for drawing flames. Have you drawn flames for other projects? How easy was it cutting freehand like that? Sorry for all of the questions but that turned out really well and you've got me curious!
    Is it OK to want to break something just so that you can weld it back together?

    Everlast PowerTIG 185 Micro IGBT AC/DC Welder

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by undercut View Post
    Cool! You have a knack for drawing flames. Have you drawn flames for other projects?
    These were my first flames Ever to draw and it was a pain. After about an hour of ugly flames I ended up with these and I went with it. I figured out the trick is to loosen up your wrist/arm and just let it flow!!

    How easy was it cutting freehand like that?
    Not bad. I started off trying to use the metal stand off that came with the torch but that didn't work at all. I finally took it off, slammed the torch to the metal and started cutting. The flames came out a little shakey so I had to clean them up with a file and flap disc but it was pretty easy since it was Aluminum.
    If I could put my pinky down, like pinstrippers do, to steady my hand it would help with the cutting but I don't think I'll be trying that anytime soon with a plasma cutter!!
    PowerTig 250EX
    Power I-MIG 200
    Power Plasma 50
    It's what you learn, After you know it all, that counts!

  8. #8
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    Mar 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by CGCINC View Post
    If I could put my pinky down, like pinstrippers do, to steady my hand it would help with the cutting but I don't think I'll be trying that anytime soon with a plasma cutter!!
    I take it you don't own one of Jody's handy-dandy TIG fingers.
    Penncrest Buzzbox - Infinite amp control! Man the 70's were good.
    Everlast Powerplasma 60 - Reliable unit, cuts well.
    Everlast i-MIG 250P w/spoolgun - Really smooth, plenty of cajones.
    Everlast 250EXT - Sometimes it just takes a kick in the balls...
    Everlast 255EXT - Just started playing

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by redbeard View Post
    I take it you don't own one of Jody's handy-dandy TIG fingers.
    I do, actually I bought three of them!! But there's NO WAY I'm getting my fingers close to the plasma beam!!!
    PowerTig 250EX
    Power I-MIG 200
    Power Plasma 50
    It's what you learn, After you know it all, that counts!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by CGCINC View Post
    I do, actually I bought three of them!! But there's NO WAY I'm getting my fingers close to the plasma beam!!!
    Why not?? You've got five tries to get it right ....
    Is it OK to want to break something just so that you can weld it back together?

    Everlast PowerTIG 185 Micro IGBT AC/DC Welder

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by CGCINC View Post
    If I could put my pinky down
    Back in the day I worked as a sign painter's gopher, and when he needed to steady his hand but couldn't lean on fresh paint he used a dowel maybe 18" long. He held the dowel in one hand and leaned the far end on an unpainted surface, then leaned his painting hand on the "bridge" created by the dowel. He could pivot on the end and do the detail painting over a large area without disturbing wet paint. Any use for you there, instead of the pinky?
    DaveO
    Oxweld oxy acet gear
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