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Thread: My DIY Cooler Project

  1. #1

    Default My DIY Cooler Project

    Just finished my DIY cooler project and since I took a little different route than many I've seen, thought I'd post some pics. This is my first time posting pics, so be gentle (this in fact is a test pic to see if I can figure out how to post).

    -RP

    Looks like the caption on the pic isn't very readable. What it says is that I started with a carbonator I got off the my local CL for $50.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by RP62; 02-09-2012 at 04:04 AM.

  2. Default

    I basically went the same route you did. I re-used the tank and reset the pressure relief on the pump to 40 PSI. I did take the back-flow preventer off the pump, though. You got a much better deal on the carbonator than I did though, Haha.

    Good luck with it!
    Vice Grips
    WD-40
    Duct Tape

  3. #3

    Default

    nice set up! wish i could of found a pump like that when i built mine.
    Gil
    powerpro 256
    lincoln 185

  4. #4

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    HI RP62
    Her is how I modified my tank for the cooler.
    And I added a fan blade to the other end of the motor.

    have fun
    Tom
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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    Everlast PM256
    Millermatic 180
    Hypertherm PowerMax 65 with machine torch
    Longevity Force Cut 80I
    DIY CNC table for plasma/routing
    13" metal lathe
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  5. #5

    Default

    Finally getting around to actually posting the rest of the pics. First of all the enclosure. As noted, the carbonator dimensions ultimately determined the height and width (12" high by 13.75" wide). I should mention that I don't have a brake and I suck at bending sheet metal with any precision and since I started this before the torch came in, I went with what I know - machined fittings and riveted construction.

    -RP

    Started with some .080 aluminum plate since I've got a big piece in the scrap pile.
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    Cut some 3/4" X 1/8" angle
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    Riveted the angle to the bottom plate.
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    Machined some corner fittings
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    Attached the corner fittings to the bottom plate
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    Attached the angle aluminum to the corner fittings
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    The corner fittings worked out real well.
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  6. #6

    Default

    Next Installment. Finishing the bottom and making the front and back panels. After this I machined the water fittings. I'll post those tomorrow.
    -RP

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  7. #7

    Default

    Next, the fittings. These are the ones I had to make because they either aren't made or I couldn't find what I wanted.
    -RP

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  8. #8

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    The last fitting is for the filler neck.

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  9. #9

    Default

    Next the heat exchanger.

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  10. #10

    Default

    Now, the fun part - final assembly. I figure all total, I've got less than $200 in parts and materials and about $1000 in my labor LOL, but it was an interesting project. I did a lot of research on this before I started and never saw this particular way of doing it so I thought I'd post my pics. I've got the output pressure adjusted at 50 psi. The probe on my kitchen thermometer goes through the inlet fitting and lays along side of the hose going to the cooler. I wrapped it with an insulating tape so that it should give a fairly close reading on the fitting/hose temp.
    -RP

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  11. #11

    Default

    Nice job! You folks that know how to do this stuff amaze me!
    Everlast PowerPlasma70
    Hobart Ironman 230
    Lincoln A-D/C 225
    'Classic' Everlast Powertig 200DX 'We don't need no steenkin pre-flow..'
    jakemateer.com

  12. #12

    Default

    I just received a fairly large Dyna Flux cooler for cooling a motor controller and motor for a machine I designed at work. I think your's may be put together better than the dynaflux.
    Everlast 200DX
    Everlast PT185
    Shoptask 3-in-1 (not currently in my garage, but I own it...)

    Any day on a motorcycle like this that ends just needing parts and labor is a good day.
    4.82, 158.67mph 1/8th mile 7.350, 200.35mph 1/4 mile

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Greater Seattle, WA
    Posts
    813

    Default

    Really nice work. I like the gauges, and the green paint is a nice touch. I'd like to see how it looks all hooked up to your TIG machine, once you've gotten it hooked up and all done. Very impressive machining work, also, and attention to detail. How did you cut the slots, holes, and shapes in that panel?

    I don't have a lathe or mill. So if I had to make fittings like that, I'd probably try to find existing fittings that have at least one threaded end or connection that I needed, saw them off, put them together and TIG weld them. I have taken two brass fittings, hacksawed desired endpieces off them, and TIG welded them together before. The brass doesn't TIG weld that cleanly (from the zinc boiling), but it is possible to make it quite solid, and even look great if you sand/polish the weld afterward, you can make the weld "disappear". It is a good way of making "custom" fittings I think, when suitable donors fittings are available.

    Tom (acourtjester): I love the way that you formed that aluminum shroud around your fan. What tool and technique did you use to do that?
    '13 Everlast 255EXT
    '07 Everlast Super200P

  14. #14

    Default hammer forming

    The process is called hammer forming you use wood for a pattern and form the metal to it's shape.
    The attached images are of a magazine pages of how its done. If you cannot read it email me and I can send them to you.
    I have used it many time to make different sheet metal things.
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    Everlast PM256
    Millermatic 180
    Hypertherm PowerMax 65 with machine torch
    Longevity Force Cut 80I
    DIY CNC table for plasma/routing
    13" metal lathe
    Small Mill
    ect, ect.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Home, Pa (Yes, that's the name of the town.)
    Posts
    121

    Default

    Wow...I like both those coolers. Great job guys!
    Brad George
    George's Welding & Repair
    Amateur at TIG, MIG, and General Fabrication.
    Current Equipment
    AIRCO Heliwelder IV 300Amp Model - Total Awesomeness!
    Hobart Handler 120v MIG

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