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Thread: Is this really a way to set the amperage on a 200 DX ?

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  1. Default Is this really a way to set the amperage on a 200 DX ?

    The other day in another welding forum I stumbled across a post about a way to utilize the digital display on what sounded like an Everlast 200 DX type machine for setting the pedal amperage for TIG. I looked for a similar post on this forum but didn't see anything. I've only had my machine for a week or so and although I'm a pedal person I've been using the torch trigger just because it's a new feature for me. I'm used to having the panel knob and display always control the max amperage so the adjustment knob on the 200 DX pedal I got is something new to me. I've read the posts on this forum and I think I understand how everything is going to work on this welder when I connect the pedal. Here's the setup process he explained:

    When you plug in the pedal it overrides the panel knob and the max amperage is set using the pedal knob and pedal position. You can set the max amperage using the display from the pedal by temporarily switching to the Stick welding position. Now when you operate the pedal knob or pedal you'll see the amperage on the display without even striking an arc. He goes on to say that you can also use this technique to set the pulse current if the rate is set to the minimum. Switch back to TIG when you're ready to weld.

    No welding for me today but I did go out, plug in my pedal and play with this a bit. The amperage values did seem to follow the pedal knob and pedal position as he claimed. The display also appeared to go up and down in a logical manner in pulse mode. So has anyone else played with this setup technique? Is it really a valid way to set up pedal currents using the display? Since the max Stick current is 160 vs. 200 on TIG and you are switching back and forth if it does work is it really displaying the true max TIG current?

    Gary

  2. #2

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    can anyone advise on this question?
    Some of the crap I use to keep busy:

    Everlast 200DX
    Millermatic 211 Mig
    Hypertherm Powermax 30 plasma cutter
    Lincoln Weld-Pak 100
    Century Stick welder
    Oxy set-up with Henrob 2000 torch
    Logan 200 lathe (60 years old)
    Jet band saw
    About 6 Harbor Freight grinders with different discs/wheels/brushes

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Greater Seattle, WA
    Posts
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    Default

    That's exactly how it works on my Super200P. I think I've heard on this forum somewhere that the newer, 200 amp IGBT-based everlast machines with the current knob in the pedal (specifically, 200DX) work similarly, but I can't personally vouch for this. I don't know about a machine that would have a different max stick welding output than TIG. (I believe my Super200 has equal max current output for both stick welding mode as it does TIG.)

    One tip if you do this technique for amp adjustment in TIG mode - be sure to remember to put it back into TIG mode before you go to set up to weld. Otherwise, if when setting up to weld, you touch the tungsten to the work while the machine is still in stick welding mode, you're going to experience a bad moment as it's going to make an arc strike without any shielding gas.

    Another way to set or verify the welding current, is if you can actually hold the TIG arc while not looking at it (and instead look over at your machine panel readout...) the panel will read out the actual amperage that is being welded with at that moment. Try and keep a steady arc length, and probably best to do this on a scrap piece of metal.
    '13 Everlast 255EXT
    '07 Everlast Super200P

  4. #4

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    You can simply step on the pedal, start the arc, and watch the maximum.
    Amp values with foot pedals are relative to begin with. The 200DX is an entry level unit and does not set the same as the more expensive units.
    Alternatively, I think it is possible to set it by flipping it to lift tig as well and set the amp values while stepping on the pedal without starting the arc. Though, right now my memory is a little vague on that.
    After a few hours of use, you can pretty much tell by the reading of a - to + number reading ranging from something like -20 to +15 or so ( more or less) indicated on the panel as a reliable mark to correspond to max amps. In other words, the panel does read, but doesn't give an actual reading.

    Using the stick to set the tig is far from accurate.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by performance View Post
    You can simply step on the pedal, start the arc, and watch the maximum.
    Simply?!, It's just that it's hard to maintain the proper distance to keep an arc going, and look at the readout, and step on the pedal while turning the pedal knob at the same time. It is like an acrobatic feat. Add in the need to look at three places at the same time. it is just a bit difficult.
    Some of the crap I use to keep busy:

    Everlast 200DX
    Millermatic 211 Mig
    Hypertherm Powermax 30 plasma cutter
    Lincoln Weld-Pak 100
    Century Stick welder
    Oxy set-up with Henrob 2000 torch
    Logan 200 lathe (60 years old)
    Jet band saw
    About 6 Harbor Freight grinders with different discs/wheels/brushes

  6. #6

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    My pedal that came with the 200DX does not have an adjust knob on it.
    Everlast PowerTig 200DX
    Snapon FM140 Mig
    Purox Oxy/Acet Torch
    Coleman 80 gal. Compressor
    7x10 Mini Lathe
    Craftsman 12" Bandsaw
    Lots of litler stuff

  7. Default

    It was interesting to see my post surface again after lots of views but no responses. I'd posted the question not long after I'd received my 200 DX and I was trying to learn as much as possible about how it operated. From an engineering perspective I'm curious as to why the panel knob and display had to work differently when you were using the torch switch vs. the pedal. My first TIG was a ThermalArc 250 GTS and the panel amperage control governed the maximum current in all operating modes whether you were using a pedal or not. My ThermalArc is DC only I'd wanted to be able to make aluminum projects and repairs at home and I thought the 200 DX looked like a good value.

    After using my 200 DX for a number of repairs and projects using DC with the torch switch and AC with the pedal I'm more than completely pleased with the unit. It had been a couple of years since I'd had a chance to TIG weld aluminum at the local CC using Miller Dynasty's and I was happy to see that the technique came right back, the results with my 200 DX were excellent. So while the engineer in me would still to know the why of the 200 DX pedal design the welder in me no longer cares :^) I'm just rough setting the pedal knob and if I'm not getting the results I need from the pedal operation I'll tweak it a bit. In fact I've done quite a bit of welding on a variety of projects without even readjusting the pedal knob.

    As a hobbyist I couldn't justify the extra $500 or so for the 250 and I'm 100% satisfied with my 200 DX.

    Gary

  8. #8

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    Gary,
    You provided your own answer about the 200DX in the last sentence. It is 500.00 extra. (Really 200+ for the 225lx) Each increasing price points offer more features. This isn't a TA GTS at a much higher price. We try to price things with more features for what you pay, while offering more power. This has worked well for us in offering additional features/additional power. We seem to sell out of all of it.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tinker View Post

    After using my 200 DX for a number of repairs and projects using DC with the torch switch and AC with the pedal I'm more than completely pleased with the unit.

    So while the engineer in me would still to know the why of the 200 DX pedal design the welder in me no longer cares :^) I'm just rough setting the pedal knob and if I'm not getting the results I need from the pedal operation I'll tweak it a bit. In fact I've done quite a bit of welding on a variety of projects without even readjusting the pedal knob.
    This is what I was waiting to hear, thanks. They should print that right on the box.
    Everlast PowerPlasma70
    Hobart Ironman 230
    Lincoln A-D/C 225
    'Classic' Everlast Powertig 200DX 'We don't need no steenkin pre-flow..'
    jakemateer.com

  10. #10

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    That is good advice Chris.
    Some of the crap I use to keep busy:

    Everlast 200DX
    Millermatic 211 Mig
    Hypertherm Powermax 30 plasma cutter
    Lincoln Weld-Pak 100
    Century Stick welder
    Oxy set-up with Henrob 2000 torch
    Logan 200 lathe (60 years old)
    Jet band saw
    About 6 Harbor Freight grinders with different discs/wheels/brushes

  11. #11

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    Last count, I think we have around, or close to 40 products, not counting accessories, consumables, and misc items. That is also several hundred pages of website for a small staff to keep up with. We cannot forsee every question or every issue or conflict that will arise on a site. We do our best. The units have had the caveat for over a year,...I know, because I added it myself sometime in November of last year. I felt like it would handle the questions that were most commonly asked before and after the sale.

    Perhaps someone can post up HOW they would handle it, precisely...no armchairing here? Keep in mind it has to fit into a box less than one inch square and still be readable, in the same box about the foot pedal differences or somewhere in context of the documentation at the top. Preferably, keep it 10 words or less to keep it simple and explain/contrast its function with the other units in our line.

    Not so easy..or maybe it is that I have stared at those pages to long to think outside the box.

  12. Default

    Like I said, its a suggestion not bashing at all. I manage sales of right at 200 products (not including parts and accessories) for our company and its no easy task as you know. Between current pictures, product descriptions and pricing its a never ending, thankless job. I am on complete overhaul 4 of our company website just in the last 4 years. As each overhaul is complete I find things getting more and more refined and the questions and problems tend to get less and less. It's an ongoing process that for most companies with changing product lines, will never end.

    My personal suggestion would be to take the product comparison section at the bottom of each page and put it at the bottom of the main welder page where you already have the small comparison chart at the top (if you feel you need to keep that section at all after you read my next thought). Then on each individual welder page, take that same chart and instead of detailing the features of all of the available machines, use the entire width of that chart to spread out the information of that one machine. This gives you more room to put in additional information while still retaining the same general page format. The problem with large comparison charts is it makes for limited space for information (which you touched on) and it also makes it easier for people to get confused between models. In addition a "FAQ" section could be added where you periodically add in information that may be relevant to the machine.


    Chris
    Everlast Powertig 200DX
    Miller Synchrowave 200
    Miller Dynasty 300 (Work Machine)
    Hobart Handler 210MVP
    HTP Microcut 30

  13. #13

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    Chris we had that on our old website. It did not work. People want to see all the products side by side and individual information on each unit on its own in one view. We have problems all the time because people won't even click through to the individual welder units as well. We have had FAQ's as well, and no one reads them before they call. We even have big red manual buttons at the top of our site, and no one sees it. We have brochures for most of our product up as well, and I still get calls about getting one. We have our warranty listed along with terms and policy at the top of every page and people get mad at me when I point the terms out and still tell me that they never saw anything about it.

    Point is, that, no matter what we do, the gripes, and complaints continue and don't even seem to diminish. Since we put our announcement about the foot pedal arrangement on the site, we regularly get threads just like this one complaining about the fact they didn't know it had a separate knob. People just don't read, and those that do, fewer still have reading comprehension skills. I am not talking about anyone or anything specific here...but it's the overall experience we have. I've even gone a different route lately and just been trying to draw pictures, dumbing down the manuals so to speak, because I get so many calls telling me the manuals don't say anything about such and such...when I know they do but you have to read to find it. People operate off of bullet lists, and diagrams these days. Can you remember when the thermostat controls on a car actually said "Defrost"? People expect simplicity these days, even on complicated product. I get calls just wanting a setting they can weld with for everything... They want all the bells and whistles, but don't want to research, read, and learn what the controls do or how to operate them. Miller has apparently experienced the same issues. They have now offered a greatly "simplified" version of the Dynasty. Select AC or DC, and amps, and you are done.

    We are working on a new site for next year...but I wear more hats than just looking after the site...which is probably my least favorite job...but I still do my best.
    Last edited by performance; 01-19-2012 at 10:34 PM.

  14. Default

    I hear what you are saying. Back in the day when Tig machines cost $2500+ I think that the average buyer was a bit more educated on the products as they were generally more experienced welders/fabricators. Now a days with the lower entry level pricing in the industry you tend to see more inexperienced/beginner users buying advanced machines and it leads to a whole lot of confusion and questions. I guess its just one of those byproducts of offering a good product for a lower price. Another Idea I had was to utilize Youtube video's in your product pages. Shoot a video of a person going over the operation and features of a unit. With the current video trends it would probably catch the attention of people these days. You could also put all of these videos into a Youtube channel to take advantage of the additional advertising value they have. A short 2-3 minute video per model should allow enough time to cover the important features of the models. Bonus points for an intelligent and attractive female in the videos LOL


    Chris
    Everlast Powertig 200DX
    Miller Synchrowave 200
    Miller Dynasty 300 (Work Machine)
    Hobart Handler 210MVP
    HTP Microcut 30

  15. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by performance View Post
    Point is, that, no matter what we do, the gripes, and complaints continue and don't even seem to diminish. Since we put our announcement about the foot pedal arrangement on the site, we regularly get threads just like this one complaining about the fact they didn't know it had a separate knob.
    Jeepers Mark, just after I decided to drop the whole issue after seeing all the bigger fish you have to fry with the 250 EXT post I read this... If look back you'll see that my original question dealt with trying to validate a method of using the display to preset the maximum current. It still seems a bit unorthodox to have the primary max current control on the pedal with no remotely meaningful pre-arc display indication except in stick mode. Having the pedal override the panel knob and also changing the operation of the digital display are definitely two different actions. After reading the 250 EXT thread and a few other pedal related posts I get impression (perhaps wrongly) that the overall welder design focus is on torch switch functionality and operation. Perhaps at the expense of the pedal and pedal operation being somewhat of an afterthought (and not strictly a product cost limitation). Is building a version of the pedal with this added control pot really more cost effective than utilizing the existing panel knob and display for TIG pedal operation? I'm not going to even open that can of worms since it's probably not the focus of this forum to entertain detailed design trade-off discussions.

    Would I be happier if the basic display worked in the manner I and some other expected? Sure but I'm satisfied with the basics and my 200 DX continues to enable me to make some darn nice welds.

    Gary

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