Share
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 30

Thread: Project #4, Big Fake Diamonds, d.fisher

  1. #1

    Default Project #4, Big Fake Diamonds, d.fisher

    Here's pictures of two big fake diamonds I made in 2011. I followed an old Belgian diamond cutters manual, Diamond Design, by Marcel Tolkowsky, published in 1912. I was using his recommendations on geometry and proportions for "correct" cuts of modern brilliant round diamonds. In my attempts, this is what happened, they are not correct in form, but as a generic form, they still read as diamonds. One diamond is made from 1/2" mdf, and the other is made from 3/4" knotty pine plywood. Both are fabricated, hollow forms.

    Here is the diamond on a table I also made, the diamond wasn't finished yet, it was bare mdf.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fisher_Darren_TolkowskyDiamond_1.jpg 
Views:	85 
Size:	34.6 KB 
ID:	5463
    d.fisher, dedicated to art and craft

  2. #2

    Default

    That's very cool, what happened to the other pictures?
    Everlast PowerPlasma70
    Hobart Ironman 230
    Lincoln A-D/C 225
    'Classic' Everlast Powertig 200DX 'We don't need no steenkin pre-flow..'
    jakemateer.com

  3. #3

    Default

    Sorry about that Jake, I had them on another computer. I'm on it now!
    d.fisher, dedicated to art and craft

  4. #4

    Default

    Here's a few shots of the fabrication. I started with the top of the diamond, called the table facet, and worked my way to the center. After that, I built the bottom half to fit the same diameter. It took several tries, and I think I got lucky as well.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_1514.jpg 
Views:	77 
Size:	131.2 KB 
ID:	5470
    d.fisher, dedicated to art and craft

  5. #5

    Default

    There is really no good way to clamp the facets together, so I used a ton of masking tape, and some small c-clamps at the top to keep everything in line. I used a polyurethane glue, so clamping pressure wasn't much of a concern either. I attached another close up of the base (one that was about 1/2" shy of the correct diameter) to show how it was started. The correct base is in the pic on the left, and in the background of the right pic.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_1509.jpg 
Views:	59 
Size:	133.7 KB 
ID:	5471 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_1515.jpg 
Views:	70 
Size:	133.8 KB 
ID:	5472
    d.fisher, dedicated to art and craft

  6. #6

    Default

    I know the inside isn't pretty, but I'm not ashamed! It's only what is on the outside that counts.

    Here's a detail of the cross members installed in both the top and bottom halves. Notice the hole in the center of the intersection. This is to hook into a circle cutting jig I made for a bandsaw. It was the only way I could figure how to create a round diamond, without racking my brain even harder in the geometry.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_1563.jpg 
Views:	56 
Size:	136.9 KB 
ID:	5473Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_1565.jpg 
Views:	60 
Size:	131.2 KB 
ID:	5474
    d.fisher, dedicated to art and craft

  7. #7

    Default

    To make the diamond round, I had to fabricate a circle cutting jig for the wood bandsaw. I made an extra large support table, because it was just me at the time in the studio, and I didn't want anything to slip. The large table also enables up to 7 foot diameter circles to be cut. In this case, the diamond is about 42" in diameter. Notice the scalloped edge on the bottom half, that is what I am trimming off.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_1553.jpg 
Views:	56 
Size:	138.2 KB 
ID:	5475Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_1557.jpg 
Views:	48 
Size:	130.8 KB 
ID:	5476
    d.fisher, dedicated to art and craft

  8. #8

    Default

    Here's a detail of the locator pin. It serves as a point to revolve around. In this case, the center hole on the diamond's cross members from the earlier photos. I had to make a few tries at locating the pin just right, see the last photo, just before the cutting was done. I purchased the aluminum track for the jig, but had to fabricate everything else, including the mount for the center pin.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_1556.jpg 
Views:	52 
Size:	142.6 KB 
ID:	5478Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_1555.jpg 
Views:	58 
Size:	143.6 KB 
ID:	5479Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_1568.jpg 
Views:	57 
Size:	146.7 KB 
ID:	5480
    d.fisher, dedicated to art and craft

  9. #9

    Default

    Here's a before and after shot. The halves were located so that the cross members on each side matched up, and served as the main connection point. all that was left to do was fill in the side facets (girdle facets).

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_1572.jpg 
Views:	69 
Size:	130.5 KB 
ID:	5481Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_1579.jpg 
Views:	78 
Size:	130.7 KB 
ID:	5482Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_1582.jpg 
Views:	76 
Size:	153.3 KB 
ID:	5483
    d.fisher, dedicated to art and craft

  10. #10

    Default

    Pretty neat looking.

    What is the purpose?

  11. #11

    Default

    nice project you built, some of the pictures aren`t showing,is the diamond all MFD or is that just a buck you built?
    Gil
    powerpro 256
    lincoln 185

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jp2code View Post
    Pretty neat looking.

    What is the purpose?

    Hey Jp,
    I am a part time sculptor, and some of the objects I like to make are based on engineering and old world designers (this one being Marcel Tolkowsky). This project, which will hopefully wind up in a gallery at some point, serves to keep my mind busy, and to also make attractive objects that other people will enjoy. I hope the viewer asks why I chose to make these works.
    d.fisher, dedicated to art and craft

  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by charger891 View Post
    nice project you built, some of the pictures aren`t showing,is the diamond all MFD or is that just a buck you built?
    Hey Charger,
    Thanks for the compliments, this diamond is made from 1/2" mdf and for the most part is hollow, with only the inner cross members being pine. I have to resize the final pictures to upload on the thread. (They were taken as very large files). I hope this answers your question, I wasn't exactly sure what you meant by "buck".
    d.fisher, dedicated to art and craft

  14. #14

    Default

    Thanks for the reply, a buck is used for metalshaping, making panels on cars ect, its usually made of mfd or plywood to the shape you are looking for then you start bending and shaping the steel to match your buck.
    Gil
    powerpro 256
    lincoln 185

  15. #15

    Default

    Here's some final shots of the mdf diamond, with a satin polyurethane finish. I made the table specifically for the diamond for display purposes.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	D.Fisher Diamond, web.jpg 
Views:	74 
Size:	16.2 KB 
ID:	5493Click image for larger version. 

Name:	D.Fisher Diamond detail 1 , web.jpg 
Views:	72 
Size:	14.3 KB 
ID:	5494Click image for larger version. 

Name:	D.Fisher Diamond detail 2, web.jpg 
Views:	69 
Size:	15.6 KB 
ID:	5495
    d.fisher, dedicated to art and craft

  16. #16

    Default

    How heavy is that? I wonder if anyone ever tried to steal it. LOL Looks like a gem from the photos.

  17. #17

    Default

    I can pick up the diamonds without too much straining, they are more bulky and awkward to handle than they are heavy. If I had to guess, the mdf diamond might weigh about 60 lbs. I am about to load up two pictures of another diamond which was made from thicker plywood. That one might be about 80 lbs.

    Hopefully there won't be any theft, it'd be hard to justify the value to my insurance!
    d.fisher, dedicated to art and craft

  18. #18

    Default

    And some more pics of the recently finished Knotty Pine Plywood diamond. I went through the same exact steps as the first. I even made templates for the mdf diamond in the beginning, so a lot of the work was much easier and faster.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	KnottyPine1.jpg 
Views:	60 
Size:	125.3 KB 
ID:	5496Click image for larger version. 

Name:	KnottyPine2.jpg 
Views:	168 
Size:	132.5 KB 
ID:	5497
    d.fisher, dedicated to art and craft

  19. #19

    Default

    Ohh, that's right. I just never made a buck before, but that makes perfect sense. I guess this could be used for a base form. Great idea! I'll have to make a new one though, the finish on each diamond will surely be messed up when tacking up the sheets.
    Thanks,
    d.fisher
    d.fisher, dedicated to art and craft

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    The Boonies of Texas
    Posts
    421

    Default

    As a faceter and gem cutter I can say "close" but not quite. Those "sunken" facets would be impossible to cut but still it is pretty impressive art.

    http://www.gemcutters.org

    Thurmond
    Miller Bobcat 3 Phase,
    Miller Suitcase X-Treme 12VS wire feeder for the Bobcat with M-25 300A .045" gun / Bernard 400A 5/64" wire mig gun .
    26 series gas cooled TIG torch, setup for quick connect to Bobcat.
    17 series gas cooled Tig Torch for Low Amp Solar Tig (Direct Solar Panel Powered Tig welding)
    Hobart Handler 187 Mig / Fluxcore
    EVERLAST PowerUltra 205P
    EVERLAST PowerTig 250 EXT 2013 Model

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •